Audio Description – Nulla Nulla

Click on the play button to hear an audio description of the Nulla Nulla

Hurstville Museum & Gallery has recently undertaken an audio descriptions project for a number of collection items to help increase the accessibility of the collection. This entry is part of the project.

Image 1: The Nulla Nulla held in Hurstville Museum & Gallery’s collection

For thousands of years Aboriginal people have inhabited the Sydney region, with family clans and nations. Aboriginal people were the traditional owners of the land on both sides of the Georges River, a natural geographical boundary. When Europeans arrived, people who spoke Dharug language lived on the on the northern side, the Kameygal at Botany Bay, and the Bediagal , in the Hurstville/Bankstown area. To the south of the Georges River were people who spoke the Dharawal language, the Gweagal at Kurnell and Norongerragal around Menai/Holsworthy[1].

Image 2: Believed to be Salt Pan Creek, Tributary of the Georges River, Peakhurst NSW, c. 1975

Salt Pan Creek, on the northern shore of the Georges River, between Padstow and Riverwood was a place of significance for the Dharug people. Many Aborigines camped there from the time of British settlement[2].  Although there were many Aboriginal communities along the river, few objects related to their material culture remain. Traditional clubs such as the Nulla Nulla, used for fighting, hunting and ceremonial purposes, were used across the Sydney area. They could also be used as ‘a projectile as well as used to make fire and make ochre’[3]. Nulla Nulla were one of the few items carried by Aboriginal people from place to place[4] and have been found in many parts of Eastern Australia.

Find out more about this item on e-hive, our collection database.


[1] ‘Aboriginal culture of the Georges River’, https://georgesriver.org.au/learn-about-the-river/aboriginal-culture

[2] Goodall, H. and Cadzow, A., ‘Aboriginal People on Sydney’s Georges River from 1820’, Dictionary of Sydney, on-line, https://dictionaryofsydney.org/entry/aboriginal_people_on_sydneys_georges_river_from_1820

[3] ‘Waddy’, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waddy

[4] ‘Nulla Nulla’, https://victoriancollections.net.au/items/51bbc5692162ef16005cf3a8


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