Georges River Art Prize in review

 

A review by work experience student Katherine, Year 10, All Saints Grammar Greek Orthodox School.

At the Museum & Gallery, I’ve been given the opportunity to participate in work experience, which has given me the opportunity to explore the exhibitions at Hurstville Museum & Gallery. A particular exhibition I have enjoyed is the Georges River Art Prize.
The Georges River Art Prize has many expressive and unique works on display. 42 artists were chosen for the finalists’ exhibition. The prize runs from the 4 November to 13 December 2017.

Georges River Art Prize 2017.

Georges River Art Prize 2017.

Artworks I found interesting
The exhibition had many artworks that sparked my interest, by the colours that were used, symbolism expressed, influences and composition. After observing the exhibition, and reading about the information given with the works about the artist, I simply couldn’t choose one favourite, but there were a few visually stimulating.

Arrangement in grey No.1 by Moritaka Suzuki. Georges River Art Prize 2017 finalist.

Arrangement in grey No.1 by Moritaka Suzuki.

An oil painting that stood out for me was Arrangement in grey No.1 by Moritaka Suzuki. The artwork displays painting techniques to create a three-dimensional form of precise draughtsmanship. Moritaka has lowered the saturation in the skin tone to create a cohesive colour harmony, the similar colour of the skin and background creates the illusion that the subject is emerging from the canvas. The brushstrokes are visible in the oil painting, representing the tactile quality of the skin. The facial expression of the woman depicted in this painting plays another important role, as Suzuki states that people are excellent at detecting emotions and the characteristics of a person through subtle facial expressions. Moritaka has tried to capture the characteristics of the subject by painting the facial expression with keen attention.

Born in New York, 1992, Moritaka Suzuki is an artist trained in a classical academic art atelier in Italy. His inspiration came from his grandfather who was an accomplished painter; Moritaka joined the Angel Academy of Art in Florence, where he studied under the name M. John Angel and Jered Woznicki. He is now based in Sydney, using the techniques acquired through his years of training, combing it with his own personal tastes and aesthetics.

The sculptures selected for the finalists’ show varied in size, but there was one that stood out for me, for its simplicity and meaning, Rhino I  by Sallwa Hourani. The ceramic sculpture is seen to represent the endangered white rhinoceros, which is close to extinction. This ceramic work explores the power and bulk of the beast in relaxed response in a medium that is enduring yet fragile.

Rhino I  by Sallwa Hourani. Georges River Art Prize 2017.

Rhino I  by Sallwa Hourani.

Rhino I  by Sallwa Hourani. Georges River Art Prize 2017.

Rhino I  by Sallwa Hourani.

REFERENCES:
Moritaka Suzuki http://moritakasuzuki.com/index.php/biography/

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